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Keep raising the level cap with no changes to the leveling experience up to that point. This leads to ever-lengthening leveling ramps that make it extremely difficult for new players to get to current content. That's because each expansion adds another several dozen hours to how long it takes to get from the start to being able to play with friends in the endgame. (Final Fantasy XIV has this problem to some degree, even though it's nowhere near as old as WoW.)
That might seem odd or negative to those who aren't currently playing WoW, but it's actually something a great number of today's WoW players have been asking for. As the levels rose in this 15-year-old game that frankly wasn't designed with a 15-year plan in mind, Blizzard encountered all sorts of frustrating game design problems that players have been cranky about, too. The WoW team has already crunched player stats like health and mana down on multiple occasions as a way to postpone fully solving the problem, so this is the culmination of something that has been underway for a few years now.

Samuel Axon Based in Chicago, Samuel is the Senior Reviews Editor at Ars Technica, where he covers Apple products, displays, hardware and software for developers and creative professionals, and more. He is a reformed media executive who has been writing about technology for 10 years at Ars Technica, Engadget, Mashable, PC World, and many others. He is also a hobbyist iOS and indie game developer.
The spell called "spiritual projection" or "astral projection" brings the caster to the Twisting Nether instead of the Shadowlands;[64] and the Twisting Nether is also referred as "realm of ghosts".[65] However, both planes don't appear to be related, as Outland is floating on the Twisting Nether,[64] but the Shadowlands can be reached in Outland in The Burning Crusade.
Unlike World of Warcraft’s other endgame dungeon activity, Mythic+ dungeons, Torghast is not timed. Instead, you have a limited number of lives before your run comes to an end. Once you’ve died a certain number of times, a giant, unkillable boss called the Tarragrue will spawn at the entrance to your current floor, and will slowly lumber toward the exit. If the Tarragrue spots you, it’ll chase you down and kill you in a single strike. But if you can reach the end of the current floor before the Tarragrue does, you’ll escape to the next floor.
But it gets even more interesting when you look at how it will work for alts (second or later characters made by existing players). New characters made by existing players will have the option of leveling up the old way in all the same old zones from the start. But they will also be able to go through the new-player starting experience if that's what players prefer.

Sylvanas Windrunner, fallen leader of the Horde, has pierced the veil between Azeroth and the realm of the dead, setting in motion a series of events that threatens to upset the cosmic balance between life and death. World of Warcraft players entering the fabled Shadowlands will find the realms of the dead in upheaval. Under the normal order, departed souls were delivered to a realm appropriate to the lives they led, but now, all souls are being funneled into the Maw, where the most wicked are damned to suffer for eternity. As they seek to right the cycle and uncover the extent of Sylvanas' designs, players will forge bonds with the Covenants who hold domain over different planes within the Shadowlands.[4]
After rumors about this possibility for the last several expansions, Blizzard has finally followed through on a level crunch. Whereas characters in the current Battle for Azeroth expansion cap out at level 120, the cap in Shadowlands will be 60—just as it was when the game first launched and just as it is in World of Warcraft Classic. Level-120 characters will be scaled down to level 50 when Shadowlands launches.

As always, though, Blizzard really delivered on the art front. Bastion is striking, with big, beautiful skies, banners realistically waving in the wind, and fascinating characters, like a humanoid, owl-like race that inhabits the zone. Blizzard artists told me that they plan to support RTX raytracing, as well as new kinds of real-time lighting, in the expansion. I'm surprised by how good modern WoW looks on a high-end PC these days, given that it originally came out in 2004, and it looks like that work will continue.


Blizzard said last week that Torghast was inspired by roguelikes — games like Hades and Dead Cells, where each failed run rewards you with knowledge and skill that aid in your next attempt. Unlike a traditional World of Warcraft dungeon, Torghast has fixed levels with procedurally generated enemy spawns. The floors start simple, and eventually evolve into elaborate wings with traps, locked doors, and puzzles.
Blizzard said last week that Torghast was inspired by roguelikes — games like Hades and Dead Cells, where each failed run rewards you with knowledge and skill that aid in your next attempt. Unlike a traditional World of Warcraft dungeon, Torghast has fixed levels with procedurally generated enemy spawns. The floors start simple, and eventually evolve into elaborate wings with traps, locked doors, and puzzles.
Keep raising the level cap with no changes to the leveling experience up to that point. This leads to ever-lengthening leveling ramps that make it extremely difficult for new players to get to current content. That's because each expansion adds another several dozen hours to how long it takes to get from the start to being able to play with friends in the endgame. (Final Fantasy XIV has this problem to some degree, even though it's nowhere near as old as WoW.)
But it gets even more interesting when you look at how it will work for alts (second or later characters made by existing players). New characters made by existing players will have the option of leveling up the old way in all the same old zones from the start. But they will also be able to go through the new-player starting experience if that's what players prefer.

Ascend the Tower of the Damned: at the heart of the Maw lies Torghast, Tower of the Damned, a cursed otherworldly prison where the wickedest souls in the universe are locked away. Highly replayable and inspired by roguelike games, heroes are invited to explore its ever-changing halls and chambers and do battle with the minions of the Jailer, Torghast's vile ruler. Those who brave its trials can claim legendary treasures and help free the heroic spirits wrongfully trapped within.

After rumors about this possibility for the last several expansions, Blizzard has finally followed through on a level crunch. Whereas characters in the current Battle for Azeroth expansion cap out at level 120, the cap in Shadowlands will be 60—just as it was when the game first launched and just as it is in World of Warcraft Classic. Level-120 characters will be scaled down to level 50 when Shadowlands launches.
But it gets even more interesting when you look at how it will work for alts (second or later characters made by existing players). New characters made by existing players will have the option of leveling up the old way in all the same old zones from the start. But they will also be able to go through the new-player starting experience if that's what players prefer.
A new army of the dead rises: to combat Sylvanas' assault on Icecrown, Bolvar Fordragon— the revered former paladin who took on the mantle of Lich King to keep the Scourge at bay—has raised heroes from among all the peoples of Azeroth to bolster the Death Knights of Acherus. With Shadowlands, pandaren and all allied races will now be able to become death knights.
Since this was an early questing experience and not an endgame one, I didn't get much sense of how Covenants—Shadowlands' new Order Hall, Garrison, or War Campaign-like systems—work. Neither did I have much time to dive into the story, though I saw enough to know that, if you like the flavor of the recent WoW expansions, you'll probably like this one, too. (I, for one, am glad we're going to get a brief respite from the Alliance vs. Horde war storyline.)
The Shadowlands were originally intended to be a fully playable zone in World of Warcraft, designed for high-level play. The idea was that as deceased characters made their way back to their corpses, they'd see high-level players battling creeps in the area, which would inspire lower level players to increase their character level so they could experience the zone for themselves.[68]
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